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Poster: vapors Date: Nov 5, 2009 5:50pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: forum chili cook-off

Possible categories to include favorite recipe, special ingredients, or some sort of story.
The prize – if anything happens with this thread it will be its own reward.

My mom made a great beef chili and after leaving her at age eighteen her recipe and bread with butter kept me nourished throughout my early bachelor days. My recipe for meatless chili that I use at home for my vegetarian daughter and at work (I am the catering chef in a college dining commons) utilizes these basic ingredients and steps:

Sauté onions, bell peppers (any colors) and chopped garlic in canola oil. Add canned diced tomatoes, salt, pepper, ground cumin, chili powder. I usually use canned beans but when time and inspiration allow soaked and cooked dried beans work real well. The final ingredient is tomato paste, and I always add a small amount of sugar. Add water as necessary and adjust seasonings and salt to taste. Simmer the chili for at least an hour – it only gets better as the flavors marry.

I also do variations in beans (my kid loves dark red kidneys, the most requested at work is just black beans, but when I can get away with it I like to use beans of many colors, including garbanzos, cannellini, pintos, etc.) vegetables (carrots, roasted corn, different types of peppers) and tomato products. When using ground beef I recommend cooking it separately and draining off excess fat before adding to the pot.

The meat, spices and peppers can vary alot.
Some like it mild and some like it hot.
Well there you have it – I hope you’re well fed.
Remember when cooking to crank Grateful Dead!

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Poster: stratocaster Date: Nov 5, 2009 6:09pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

i have a recipe that is a northern variation on one winning recipe from the Texas Chili cookoff some years back...now Texas chili has no beans, only beef, so I add about 2-3 cans worth of beans to the base, which is a mix of beef broth, chicken broth, water, mix of tomato sauce (plain spaghetti sauce works fine) and/ or paste and beer, three pounds of beef (used bison once and that turned out great)... and the seasonings include cumin, chili powder, louisiana hot sauce, jabenero pepper sauce, chipotle pepper sauce, white pepper, black pepper, salt is one of the most important elements to any meat dish and garlic powder...small amount of onion, white tyically and chopped very finely tossed in...no overkill on any one flavor per say and not searing hot, a foot on the throttle to make it edible...still quite spicey to be sure...folks love this recipe...I'm not a cook, but I can make fucking chili and a mean Southern style deep fried turkey and barbeque meats...the rest is my wife's territory...

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Poster: Misty Eastwood Date: Nov 5, 2009 8:14pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

I was attempt to avoid these type of threads, but WTF >

The Veggie Green Chili (and if Fred is watching, it's gluten free)....oh, I hurt my toe can someone call a tow truck ?
Fresh or frozen roasted Hatch chiles - two heaping cups, stemmed, seeded, chopped
5 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped
2 ripe tomatoes, seeded, chopped - I used Roma tomatoes
3 cups vegetable broth - reserve 4-5 tablespoons
Pinch of sea salt, to taste
Fresh ground pepper, to taste
A dash of balsamic or sherry vinegar
2 teaspoons raw organic sugar
2 tablespoons cornstarch - dissolved in the reserved broth

In a large saucepan, combine the chiles, garlic, tomatoes, broth, sea salt and pepper, vinegar and sugar. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat; reduce the heat a bit and maintain a gentle, constant low simmer for ten minutes. Stir in the cornstarch paste and continue to cook, stirring for another 7 to 10 minutes, until the sauce is thickened [but still pourable]. Taste test. If you used very hot chiles and the sauce is too spicy, add a touch more sugar. Remove from heat and set aside.

Use this green chile as a sauce on enchiladas and casseroles, or pour it over eggs and tortillas, or rice and beans - you name it. I can't imagine anything that wouldn't cozy up to green chile.


This post was modified by deadski on 2009-11-06 04:14:46

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Poster: vapors Date: Nov 6, 2009 4:30pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Thanks for the straight forward, no nonsense input. I’m going to try this out with a fajita buffet I’m doing tomorrow at work. We usually make a salsa verde with tomatillos which took some experimenting to get right.

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Poster: Misty Eastwood Date: Nov 6, 2009 5:54pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Ya, that can be a strange salsa. Tomatillos can be very acidic and plain, but roasted habaneros and anaheim can really add the kick you are looking for....

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 7, 2009 5:08am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Yeah, I should've explained more about that fact with tomatillos (acidity, blandness)...they really are just there for "substance/greenery" and it's the other spices/chiles that make the chili...you have to adjust carefully depending on the tomatillos you find at your market.

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Poster: vapors Date: Nov 7, 2009 1:36pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

At work I am responsible for ordering produce – our dc does 6000 meals a day. The variety of peppers available to us is quite good and we get tomatillos too but like you say they can often lack flavor. Picked too soon for shipping, alas. We do use local VT/NH produce seasonally. Apples are my thing now.

All in the cooking and seasoning (and sweetening)

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Poster: Misty Eastwood Date: Nov 7, 2009 2:17pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Ya, I hear them apples on moosehead mountain can really brew up a mean ass cider. I used to grade apples and what a chore on the noodle that became. Like 300 varieties and grades. The best cover-up on tomatillos are young zebra heirlooms I discovered.

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Poster: skies Date: Nov 6, 2009 6:14am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Statocaster : yum,yum, your texan recipe for chili is most interesting (but somewhat too complicated for me to do )

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Poster: dead-head_Monte Date: Nov 6, 2009 10:53am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

green3x.jpghatch7x.jpggreen5x.jpg
excellent Mexican "fast food" in NM and Texas
Taco Cabana wisely serves beer and cold drinks
dnGR2mqbmr3QwQaby-Fddz-dish-taco-cabana-275x212.jpgdkYf-Iqbmr3QwQaby-Fddz-interior-taco-cabana-268x255.jpgdo8BRyqbmr3QwQaby-Fddz-dish-taco-cabana-270x216.jpg

800px-Taco_Cabana_Dallas.jpg

I'd love to open a Taco Cabana in Fort Collins

I've never seen a Taco Cabana anywhere in Colorado

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Poster: roughyed Date: Nov 6, 2009 3:35pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Graet recipes throughout. In all the recipes which start with oil/fat - try sweating scotch bonnet chillis in it first (stand back and wear a mask) before adding your first ingredient. Then keep to your recipe, including your usual chillis. I guarantee you'll double your beer consumption.

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Poster: high flow Date: Nov 6, 2009 3:57pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: mmmmmmm, chili w/ country crackers

http://www.archive.org/details/cracker2006-04-29.flac16

Set 3.

Food for your ears.

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Poster: skies Date: Nov 6, 2009 10:56am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

That plate of chili looks grate , DHMonte !Ouawh !

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Poster: skies Date: Nov 6, 2009 11:07am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

I am getting frantic for chili after reading all these amazing recipes ! Yum Euh , I never made a chili yet . Thats what living in France can do to you : no chili !But I ' ve got to try making one with you secrets :cumin and brown sugar .For hot peppers i will only find basque green peppers , methinks .

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Poster: skies Date: Nov 6, 2009 6:11am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Thanks for the chili recipe , Vapors !I can't find black beans in France , a shame as I like them best in mexican foods .

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Poster: cush212 Date: Nov 6, 2009 10:45am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

OK... First off real Chili does NOT include beans of any sort. So, by virtue of what ever weight ( mostly my own) that I carry around here, all recipes including beans are disqualified!

Having beeen a chef for over 20 years I will noww disclose my secret recipe for the perfect "cheater" Chili.

Get a big hunk of pork or beef from the price reduced for quick sale bin at Safeway (whatever you have locally) Brown it up nicely in a saute pan with onions and jalapenos (or chiles to taste) Garlic doesn't hurt either. Throw the whole mess into a crockpot, add a large can of verde or colorado (red or green for you gringos) medium to hot enchilada sauce, plug in, get some sleep, Chili to die fro in the morning!!!

Trust me, I'm a perfessional!!!

This post was modified by cush212 on 2009-11-06 18:45:43

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Poster: high flow Date: Nov 6, 2009 10:43am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Canned chilis taste like tin. Roast your own.

I make 2 types of chili. My granny's chili, which has beans. And my wife's Nana's chili which is authentic Mexican chili.

I don't do recipes for these, I go by memory and taste.

I do, however, think there is a correct order of operations.

1. Brown the meat. Make sure it is carmelized(before removal) and leave the browned and burned bits in the pan. Let the meat get brown!!!!! Be patient. Nobody like gray meat in their chili.

2. Saute' your veg., adding garlic last, just a few seconds before the liquid goes in. Don't burn onions or garlic, that will leave a bad taste. Let them onions sweat. You may add herbs and spices to your onions once they become translucent.

3. If you plan to reduce your liquid, I suggest you add salt sparingly at first. As the broth reduces, add salt to taste.

3a. If you are making a "soupy" chili, go ahead and season to taste once all your liquid has been added.

I recommend roasting your chilis at home. It is VERY easy. I normally coat a small saute' pan with veg. oil and place the chilis on the hot pan. Allow the chilis to blacken. Do not discard the blackened outer skin of the chili, that is a large part of the flavor you're trying to achieve. I leave the seeds in. For color and flavor, you might choose a Mexican chili powder. Fine, just be sure you like the taste. I've had chili powder that tasted like saw-dust......that's no good for anybody.

Taste your chili often as it cooks. Use the best ingredients you can find(use cheap of left-over meat). We often roast whole chickens or make pork sirloin and the left-over meat is perfect for chili.

You can't rush a really good chili.

P.S. - If you fork stands-up in your chili, that means you've made dog food.

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Poster: cush212 Date: Nov 6, 2009 11:10am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Roasted Chilis being one of the best scents ever, aside from maybe some other Herbs... I do agree, mine is just a cheater recipe, I'm too old and lazy to do it the hard way...

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 6, 2009 11:08am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

All very familiar...folks don't realize you have to properly "prep" both the meats and the plant products, and often, spicing those at the initial stage is best, adding more when you have the chili going.

And yes, if I neglected to mention it, you start the night before, and you do not eat til ~ 24 hrs later. Must simmer most of the day for maturity.

Yep--left over meats of most any kind work very well in chili of any sort...can be a change to go "upscale" with porks and beef cuts on the elite end, but not necessary at all.

You clearly are a chili maestro; looks like we have a few hereabouts!

I just hope you know a good corn tortilla when you see one; Johnny scared the bejeebers out of me with that comment above!

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 6, 2009 11:16am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Oh, and now that we're really talking trivia of fine distinctions, one thing I've noticed is that you can usu get Hatch Valley chiles (in a can, I know) in other states, but the fresh ones can vary quite a bit...IE, they can be bland at times (CA? Midwest? Not sure where they hail from). Also, agree about the skin, but find it depends--with some, it can add too distinctive of a flavor if you use as many as I like to for a super green chili. The tomatillos are a necessity for the color base as well, but can vary like the chiles, and add too much acidity at times.

Like you, everything varies with each batch, based on taste, and depending on who's coming to dinner, etc. Here in the SW we can get ALL the ingred we want, and vary them accordingly--esp some of the hard to find MX spices--and best of all, FRESH!

Like CUSH (hey Chefmeister!), having learned the "full protocol" I often take short cuts on some aspects (like the canned chilis, packaged torts, etc.).

But, as long as you, and the guests, like it, it's cool.

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Poster: cush212 Date: Nov 6, 2009 10:47am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

I also have a secret recipe for more traditional (still no stoopid beans) Chili but you will have to show up with grocery money to taste it...

Shhhh... It's a secret.

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Poster: amosearle Date: Nov 6, 2009 7:12am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

I'm getting gas just reading these.

I do agree with WT on chili cooking theory.
Browning, then braising, with time for chilies to do the voodoo that they do.

Here's to spicy chili that's out of this world, with the taste that's famous from here to Uranus!

This post was modified by amosearle on 2009-11-06 15:12:13

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: Nov 6, 2009 9:00am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

My Dads side of the family is from Northern New Mexico ( via a land grant from Spain before it was the USA ). IMO the best chil comes from there. Don't have any recipes but I wish I had. All I know is the Green Chili there is VERY green in color meaning more green chilis and less with the pork and no tomato. I don't know what kind they use but it sure isn't Aneheim as it will blow your head off.

Red Chili - NEVER NEVER use kidney beans. That's a midwestern joke. Chili cooks seperate with plenty of fat left in ( the meat is also coated with flower). Then the chili is put on a bowl of PINTO ( only pinto ) beans. Beans cooked all day from raw ( soak them first ) never canned.

Sorry I don't have a recipe but just had to chime in on REAL chili

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 6, 2009 9:32am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

NM is where I love to go from my Mex food...it's all good, but folks don't realize how diff NM is from AZ and both from TX.

NM chiles cannot, CANNOT be beat. NM raised folks that I have met that got their cooking skills from their overwt (bless them, every pound!) moms are ALWAYS the best for fixing up Mexican food.

Trust me (and Johnny!).

Real MX food from folks in "real" MX, is typically made with turkey and goat (chicken and beef are more US/elitist style), and you want to spice and cook the crap out of most of the meats you get...and of course, CORN is the only staple, rarely flour is seen...near the coast, lots of fish and turtle for tacos and chili.

Green chili is a great breakfast food, esp good with eggs and more choizo.

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Poster: Mandojammer Date: Nov 6, 2009 9:51am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Chili Pepper Institute

WT -

I'm sure you know about this place.

http://aces.nmsu.edu/chilepepperinstitute/

Buy some of the jolokia pods and the jolokia salsa.

Be careful.



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Poster: cush212 Date: Nov 6, 2009 10:42am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Can you believe people in cinncinati (I think) eat Chili on pasta? How fucked up/ goofy is that?

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Poster: Mandojammer Date: Nov 6, 2009 7:30am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

WT - I've already copied down your recipe.

Okay, here's my problem (among others) - this recipe is never exactly duplicated since I sorta wing it each time

Mandojammer's Beef, Pepper and Bean Chili (with West African Nuclear Death Option)

- 1 1/2 pounds of shredded beef (more or less depending on how meaty you want it) braise beef and drain, set aside

In a big ass pot, toss the following:
- 10-12 large tomatoes - (if you dont like the skin, blanch by dropping in boiling water for 2 minutes then set in ice water for 1 minute, the skins will pull right off. Cut to the size you like, keep or discard the seeds if you want, keep the juice as it will reduce when cooked)
- 1 large yellow onion chopped
- 1 large green bell pepper chopped

(I am a wuss, I wear gloves for the following few steps. Well I do now - ever since the time I didn't and took my contact lenses out later that day)

- 4 hot banana peppers
- 4 sweet banana peppers
- 6-8 chopped jalapeno peppers
- 2-4 serrano peppers
- 2-4 habanero peppers chopped
- 4 dried chipotle peppers, chopped

- 2 cans of tomato paste to thicken things up
- chopped fresh cilantro
- 1/4 cup lime juice
- 1 cup red beans
- 1 cup black beans
- 1 cup kidney beans
- 1 cup Great Northern beans
- 1 crushed garlic clove

Bring to a low boil and stir until well mixed. I reduce it 2-3 times, adding water each time and boiling back down. Once I have a consistency that looks reasonable I add in the beef and simmer until the beef is worked in. Add water as necessary. Then the whole mess goes into three crock pots and slow cooks all day.

Serve with fresh chopped cilantro as desired.

West African Nuclear Death Option:

Background - I have a good friend in Winston-Salem who has a Tam Tam Mandingue djembe drum school. He is one of 17 Tam Tam Mandingue djembe professors in the country, certified under Mamady Keita. He travels to Africa each year to study. A few years ago he came home (illegally) with seeds of the West African Birdseye pepper - (google it, it's hotter than shit) He grows them and makes salsa (West African Nuclear Death Salsa - WANDS) with the peppers and uses habaneros to cut the spiceiness. I have four jars of the salsa and two jars of dried pure peppers. I add 2 tablespoons of the salsa or half a dried pepper chopped up finely to a crock pot of the chili and that is more than enough. I don't know how to describe the flavor - the salsa is so damn hot I get the hiccups every time I eat it. The burn is intense but not overpowering and the birdseye pepper has a superb flavor. And once you have had a chipful, you might as well keep eating it since you have already been nuked.

If you want to eat a lot of the salsa it is best with a bowl of ice cream. Don't eat the ice cream - sit in the bowl the following day after you have taken care of business.

This year I am going to add some pieces of Bhut jolokia pepper pods. 1 million Scoville Heat Units!!! I don't know why, but I will be able to say that I made and ate chili made with the hottest pepper in the world. The jolokia makes a scotch bonnet habanero look like cotton candy.

I am an idiot for doing this.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 6, 2009 9:36am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

"Nuclear Death Option"

Love it!

Please see note above to JOTS for addt'l tips on mine.

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Poster: Mandojammer Date: Nov 6, 2009 9:41am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Got it - cut and pasted the whole thread. It got down to 52 last night here in SE VA so I might cook up some chili tomorrow.

I like to cook the beef to the point where it is borderline dry - it think it soaks up the flavor a little better.

Also forgot to mention - Mrs. Mando has a huge herb garden in the yard. She has a varigated oregano that is intense and great in the chili. Every now and then I toss in some chopped Thai basil or African blue basil. The Thai is very sweet and complements the habanero and chipotle for a sweet smoky flavor. The African blue basil is borderline hot/sweet and gives the chili its own unique taste.

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: Nov 6, 2009 12:34pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

" It got down to 52 last night "

Dang Mondo. You are a wuss! It got UP to 50 here and it feels great!

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Poster: Finster Baby Date: Nov 6, 2009 5:03am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

I also do a beanless chili. I'm starting to think that I am the world's only dead head that thinks beans are quite possibly the nastiest food ever. LOL...

My recipe is open to many variations. I have used pork, veal,beef and a few times venison. Almost always cubed meats, not ground.

The one I use most often that the family really likes is with shredded beef. Whenever I make pot roast (chuck roast works best), I make an extra one so that I have plenty of leftovers. Slow roasted chuck is great for shredding.

I use 2 lbs of shredded chuck. I add 2 lbs of ground fresh breakfast sausage. I add to it finely chopped onions and red and green bell peppers and alot of chopped garlic that have been sauteed.
I add canned diced tomatoes with juice, beef broth and tomato paste. Spices vary but usually include onion powder, salt and pepper, cayenne pepper and chili powder.
Always add a little sugar too!
I usually add canned green chilis and some type of hot sauce to give it a little kick. Sometimes if I want more heat, I will chop and saute fresh habaneros in a little bit of oil. Then I discard the peppers and brown the meat in the pepper oil.
I cook my chili in cast iron because I think it adds to the flavor. I usually let it simmer for at least 4 hrs if not longer. I also find that it gets more flavorful the next day after it has had a chance to fester in the fridge over night.

I also have a variation on serving it that is different from most. The recipe calls for serving it over rice, but we don't. My wife likes it served over hot biscuits. I like mine served over broken up Fritos with shredded cheddar cheese on top. The fritos add a little saltiness that I think goes well with it.

This recipe makes for alot of leftovers which get vacuum sealed and put in the freezer. Think I'll call the wife now and have her pull some out for tonight!!!!

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 6, 2009 6:51am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: It's the little things that make a difference

Browning the meat in the pepper saute pan is always an excellent idea...

Folks don't often recognize that you cannot just "throw everything" together when do this...browning the meats and sausages is important. Clarifying the onions with garlic is important. Using salt pork to assist rather than oils (spray!?! if someone mentions this I will ask the mods to delete the receipe! JK...maybe) adds important flavor, salt, and authenticity...

Corn tortillas are an absolute must. Esp for green chili.

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Poster: denise BERGER Date: Nov 8, 2009 4:52am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: It's the little things that make a difference

I have just answered to yuou

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 8, 2009 7:32am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: It's the little things that make a difference

What was my question?

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Poster: deadnazi Date: Nov 8, 2009 8:11am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: It's the little things that make a difference

This just might compliment the pork salt, but the sweet butter adds to the corn milk.

Hot Chili Basted Corn Bones

6 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons chipped fresh cilantro
1 tablespoon tomato paste
2 tablespoons hot chili sauce
4 corn on the cob husks removed
Butter
Fresh cilantro leaves

Whisk oil, cilantro, tomato paste and chili sauce in a bowl.
Cut each corn cob into three sections and blanch in a pot of boiling water 2 minutes.
Drain then place in a shallow dish and pour marinade over corn to coat well.
Cover and allow sit 2 hours.
Grill the corn on a hot barbecue for 30 minutes regularly turning and brushing with marinade.
Serve hot topped with butter and marinade and garnished with cilantro leaves.



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Poster: denise BERGER Date: Nov 8, 2009 4:51am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: It's the little things that make a difference

I have chosen greateful dead forum because Iam 82 years old!

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 8, 2009 7:31am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: It's the little things that make a difference

Good for you! Not sure why you posted in response to me--is it because of the Fountain of Youth components of William Tell's Green Chili?

Do tell...

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Poster: cush212 Date: Nov 6, 2009 10:40am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Elk makes Very good Chili also...

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Poster: Styrofoam Cueball Date: Nov 6, 2009 11:13am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Finster Baby Said: "I also do a beanless chili. I'm starting to think that I am the world's only dead head that thinks beans are quite possibly the nastiest food ever. LOL..."

You are not alone.

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Poster: cush212 Date: Nov 6, 2009 11:19am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Me like beans, just not in Chili...


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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 5, 2009 8:00pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

I am so there...have been making award winning (well...sorta) Green Chile for going on 35 years now!

Saute salt pork cubes, roughly half pound, using some lard (yes, if you do not use real lard and salt pork, stop now and remove yourself from this competition). Use large cast iron pot, or similar large container that can eventually hold 3 qt or so.

Add roughly 1-2 cubed onions, and 10 cloves of garlic, minced/chopped (yes, a crap load). Saute with pork and lard til clear.

Add 2 lbs each pork tenderloin and stew beef (or any extra meat products you have around from prior meals--really, I have used everything you can think of), and brown these cubed meats.

In a sep skillet, brown up a few sausages--make sure two of them are hot Italian, and two are high grade chorizo sausage (in skin, not the kind that falls about). Cube these to same size ("bite") and add to meat mixture.

Add two large cans fire roasted green chiles (leave in liquid).

Add 12-18 skinned, cubed tomatillos.

Add 2 jalapenos or others to taste.

Add half a typical seasoning jar of cumin. Yes, that much.

Add some sage, and quite a bit of cilanto, depending on your taste.

Salt and pepper, if necessary.

Simmer all day.

Eat with CORN tortillas (flour? Are you joking?).

More complicated than this, BUT I guarantee you will love William Tell's Green Chile.

Everyone does.

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: Nov 6, 2009 9:06am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

I'm going to try your recipe Tell only I'd like to use real not canned chili's. Also - I dont like corn tortillas and Homeade flour totrillas are the best!

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 6, 2009 9:22am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Ah--now you're talking! A thin (yes...lard based!) flour tortilla is something altogether different! Thin, flaky--mmmm.

Yeah, whatever you like--go for it! Corn does add something distinctive to green chili though, that even the best flour cannot achieve. We have a special cst iron skillet for making tort's but it's a lot of work and I assumed folks would wimp. I do and I am a perfectionist on this shit.

And, fire roasting your own chiles is always fun and rewarding, but lots of work...using the cans cuts a lot of time out of the equation, and adds some nice liquid.

For the receipe, it is all done by taste--you could cut back on cumin if you like, and garlic too. You will also need to add some fluids, and you can add beans to achieve that, and add some fiber (just don't tell any purists I said it was okay!).

Mex oregano (probably won't have it up there?) is really nice, along with sage (small amt), and cilantro, but cumin should be your primarily spice. You can use oil instead of lard and salt pork, but you'll need salt in that case (spice).

Main thing is to brown the meats, clear the onions, and add to large pot with chiles/tomatillos (can you get those up there? If not, you have to use tomatos which turn it red...yuck).

All the spices and addt'l chiles are to taste, preference.

Main ingred should be: meat, chiles, tomatillos, onions, garlic.
Main spices should be: cumin, oregano (Mex only--it's different!), cilantro, sage, salt, pepper.

Have fun!

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Poster: skies Date: Nov 6, 2009 3:59pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

It would be a grate idea to do a mega chili at Sol Party in Kent next summer .Would beat english and scotish cooking ! Ought to convinced mister Robthewordsmith to roll up his sleeves there and Make us a W.Tell chili recipe !

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Poster: skies Date: Nov 6, 2009 6:18am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Lard and pork in a chili ,W.Tell ?

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 6, 2009 6:41am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The TRUTH and the illusion

Chili is a Southwest food dish...The SW is largely influenced by Mexico...visit any, and I mean ANY, food store patronized primarily by our south of the border neighbors...the largest selection of Lard in various sizes and formats that you can imagine.

Green chili, by far the "best" of the various types, can be based on any number of meats, and most use a selection of what's available. However, most purists would argue "beef for red, pork for green".

The secret to a great green chili is in the cumin + tomatillos + green chiles + Mexican oregano (notice I left it out of the above? have to have a few secrets!).

The color must be green, and I know it does not sit well with the health minded Forumites, BUT the fact is, lard is integral to Mexican cooking. Ask any one that does it for a living...anything else is just New Age Imitation.

Now, the red chilis described above all sound good, but beans and absence of meat mean you might as well call it soup and be done with it...

Sorry, but that's the way it is.

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Poster: skies Date: Nov 6, 2009 8:43am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The TRUTH and the illusion

So ,who is winning the chili recipe contest ?Methinks all are winners because I'd like to taste each recipe as long as I don't have to do the cooking !Yet ,even if you don't approve , William Tell , I was most interesed by Vapors's vegetarian recipe ,na !

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Poster: Misty Eastwood Date: Nov 6, 2009 9:53am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The TRUTH and the illusion

ASSHOLE AND ELBOWS =

TRUE TEXAS WEINER CHILI

This is for the Tiger in you.... > IT'S GRRRRATEFUL !!!!!
http://www.archive.org/details/gd71-11-14.weir.8738.sbeok.shnf

lb. ground beef
1 med. onion, chopped
1 clove garlic
1/2 qt. water
6 oz. tomato paste
2 tsp. chili powder
2 tsp. paprika
2 tsp. cumin
1 tsp. oregano
1/2 tsp. cinnamin
1/2tsp. all spice
1/4-1/2 tsp. cayenne (optional)
salt
pepper

Saute' onion and garlic till transparent
add beef and brown,when done drain off grease
add water tomato paste and bring to boil
add remaining ingredients and simmer at least an hour

Bun
Well Grilled Hot Dog
Mustard
Generous portion of raw onion
Sauce

....and this one will bring out the Tiger in you.
http://www.archive.org/details/alo2005-11-06.Flac16

This post was modified by deadski on 2009-11-06 17:53:08

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Poster: elbow1126 Date: Nov 6, 2009 10:15am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The TRUTH and the illusion

Huh?

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Poster: clintorus Date: Nov 11, 2009 5:48pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The TRUTH and the illusion

don't worry elbow I know you don't like Hot Dog.

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Poster: Cliff Hucker Date: Nov 6, 2009 9:52am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The TRUTH and the illusion

You phony! I know all about your ilk, Ive lived in France for years. You drink wine that comes out of a plastic jug...

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Poster: skies Date: Nov 6, 2009 10:52am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The TRUTH and the illusion

Euh ? You breaking into a rash again , Cliffy? Me , drinking wine in a plastic bottle ? you are out of your frikking mind ,dude ! Besides i only drink Asti Spumante on New Year !

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Poster: Cliff Hucker Date: Nov 6, 2009 12:17pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The TRUTH and the illusion

Do you even listen to the Grateful Dead plonk drinker? I have noticed you never respond in the music related threads. This is a Grateful Dead forum, are you familier with this band? Sure wouldnt know it from your contribution here! I remember the foul stench of the unwashed faux hippies like you at the Place de la Comedie in Montpellier, take a shower...

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Poster: skies Date: Nov 6, 2009 12:41pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The TRUTH and the illusion

Hey you C.Hucker : you are a crazy nutcase !And to get your update on Montpellier , it's faggots' city nowadays , so I heard , might just be your cup of tea , hé !

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Poster: Cliff Hucker Date: Nov 6, 2009 1:40pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The TRUTH and the illusion

I knew a pecheur in Le Grau du Roi who smelled much like I perceive your odor to be. He knew how to catch Thon Rouge, but I found his odeur offensive...

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Poster: skies Date: Nov 6, 2009 3:28pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The TRUTH and the illusion

Cliffy ,you have a real problem these last few months :you think too much about me ! Relax dude ,i'll never bother meeting you beyond this here forum ,so keep stuffing your own smelly fishes !

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Poster: Cliff Hucker Date: Nov 6, 2009 6:44pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The TRUTH and the illusion

Just once, couldnt you comment on the music or something Grateful Dead related?

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Nov 6, 2009 7:24pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The TRUTH and the illusion

I have a real good guess as to what smells like fish

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Poster: skies Date: Nov 7, 2009 3:46am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The TRUTH and the illusion

BDevil : C.Huker is obsessed with his fishes with most of his exixtence spent on his fishing boat ,he can'tget tha stinking smell off him anymore .He is so bonkers about this ,he invents stories to keep him compagny with more smelly illusions . A truth he'd like to blame for those in Europe . But it so happens i NEVER cook fish , can't stand odeurs nor sights of dead fishes . Pouah !So his wine , fish and junky talk need a head shrink to get rid of his mental obsessions . YOU and Mando , the know-it-all should have no problem getting over you mutual obsessions together !Na .!

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Poster: Cliff Hucker Date: Nov 7, 2009 9:00am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The TRUTH and the illusion

C'mon dude, just one show reference, just one time mention the music. Cant you do it?

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Poster: Misty Eastwood Date: Nov 7, 2009 11:10am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The TRUTH and the illusion

Ask Jerry > EPA rocks

http://www.archive.org/details/fishbone1985-12-27.flac16

King Neptune's pHish Chili (non-cappino)

1 lb Kielbasa
1 Head celery
A few assorted peppers
Big onions
Lots of garlic
2 cn Whole or stewed tomatoes or
1 cn Octopus in hot sauce
1 lb Chopped clams (keep broth),
1 lb Shrimp (peeled, etc), or so
1 lb Scallops, or so
1 lb Fish (whatever you like, or
Rice
Chili powder
Cumin
Oregano
Crushed red pepper
Black pepper

Saute the celery, peppers, onions, and garlic in a little olive oil until they wilt. Add the kielbasa, chopped into bite size pieces, and some chili powder (I use a lot). Cook a little longer, and add the tomatoes clams and octopus: the mixture should be wet and sort of soupy. Turn down the heat and let this simmer for at least an hour, stirring and adding more liquid as needed (I use clam broth or watered-down tomato juice). Check the seasonings and add what you think it needs - at least a little of each of the above mentioneds. At this point you add rice -I just kind of eyeball the liquid in the pot and guess - anywhere from one to two cups (if you overdo it add more liquid 8-) ). Cover and simmer some more, but keep a closer eye on it as it thickens so the bottom doesnt burn. As you get closer to serving time, add the fresh fish, scallops first (they take a bit longer to cook), then shrimp, then the whitefish, cut into chunks. Adjust seasonings (as youve actually been doing all along) and stand back. People are always afraid to try this, but they always rave about it when they do. I make it for "serve yourself" parties and when Im feeling especially nice about my family. I was just thinking that calamari would be a great add in to this..hmmm.

This post was modified by deadski on 2009-11-07 19:10:49

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Poster: deadjunkie Date: Nov 5, 2009 9:30pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

I don't have a favorite recipe, as I like to try different ones each time I cook chili, so I'll go with the special ingredients category.
1. Home brewed stout.
2. Home grown Thai dragon peppers.
3. Home grown Tomatoes, Bell peppers, Onions, Beans, Garlic, whatever else you like to put into your pot. (Everything tastes better when it's home brewed or home grown.)

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Poster: DeadRed1971 Date: Nov 7, 2009 2:59pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

You're speaking my lingo. I've got 8lbs or Maris Otter pale, some crystal 80, cara-pils, chocolate malt, roasted barley and Quaker oats ready to make my oatmeal stout tomorrow.

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Poster: cush212 Date: Nov 6, 2009 11:21am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Other than "crank the Dead" I have seen no forum relevence in this thread... So, I'm thinkin' A handfull Of Skulls and Roses cannot be detrimental to ANY Chili recipe!

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Poster: Misty Eastwood Date: Nov 6, 2009 6:14am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off w/ Pig

Even though I don't eat meat on friday (shoma shamus) I'd like to share my Pig Chili I stew quite often during the winter.

PIG OUT > http://www.archive.org/details/gd70-07-14.sbd.cotsman.17815.sbeok.shnf

PIG CHILI
1 pound coarsely ground beef
1 pound lean pork shoulder, ground
1 large onion, diced
1 cup sliced celery
4 tablespoons chili powder, medium to hot
1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
2 cans (14.5 ounces each) diced tomatoes
12 ounces V-8® vegetable juice
1 cup beef broth
1/2 cup beer
3 bay leaves
3 large garlic cloves
1 can chopped green chiles, (3-4 ounce)
1 bell pepper, diced
1 1/2 teaspoons dried leaf oregano
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 can (15 ounces) small red beans, drained and rinse salt, to taste
2 tablespoons cornmeal, mixed with 3 tablespoons warm water, optional

In a large kettle or dutch oven, brown beef and pork until no longer pink. Add onion, celery, chili powder, cumin, tomatoes, vegetable juice, beef broth, beer, bay leaves, garlic, green chilies, bell pepper, oregano and pepper. Bring to a simmer and cover. Cook for 3 to 4 hours or until tender, stirring frequently and adding water if necessary. Add beans, if using, and salt, to taste. If too much liquid, stir in cornmeal mixture to thicken a bit.

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Poster: Earl B. Powell Date: Nov 6, 2009 6:18am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

I entered and won a 2nd place in a biker bar chili cook-off several years ago. I knew going in that we were required to give our chili a name, so I called it "Old 55." The name comes from 5 different beans and 5 different peppers.

Begin by chopping 5 varieties of peppers, jalapeno, habanero, sweet red, Hungarian and Serrano. I only use one each in a large stock pot so it's not as hot as it may seem. (Remember chefs, wash hands after cutting peppers to avoid embarrassing genitalia issues.) Chop 1 sweet onion, Vidalia or Peruvian. Lightly saute' until the onion becomes translucent, then add chopped or ground sirloin. Saute until meat is browned, then drain off fat.

I use canned diced tomatoes and tomato sauce as a base. Then add Pinto, Light red kidney, dark red kidney, garbanzo and (well drained) black beans. Use a quality chili powder and add until the red of the sauce turns brownish in color.

Personally I like hot spicy chili and if the company is sharing in my tastes, I add ground red chili and soften it's kick with locally made sourwood honey.

For a little extra color, add a small can of yellow sweet corn and if you like your chili sweet and hot, add some pineapple chunks.

Chili always tastes better the second day, so here's a tip for you Yankees that have snow on the ground. After the chili simmers for an hour or so, remove from stove and set outside in the snow for half an hour or more. Return to stove to finish and it's already like the second day!

BTW, all these ideas are making Mr. Earl mighty hon-gree!


This post was modified by Earl B. Powell on 2009-11-06 14:18:51

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 6, 2009 6:55am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

"...drain off fat..."

Mr. Earl!?? Say it ain't so! Shame...methinks you are getting healthier every day...you bastard!

This is my once a month (or two) event in which caution (dietary) is thrown to the winds...at my age, the wife and I have to take our excitement where we can...

Hot foods are the original aphrodisiac, and if we were younger, well...uh...okay, melodramatic moment there. Nevermind.

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Poster: Earl B. Powell Date: Nov 6, 2009 8:20am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

WT: I should clarify. If feeding a bunch of slobs in front of a football game, refrain from draining off fat. If preparing while your wife looks on, drain and pat with paper towels to remove any trace of fat.

I note that you are a chili purist and while I enjoy that too, most of the folks east of the Mississippi only have an awareness of typical truck stop chili. Meat and beans. This is with the exception of Cincinnati where the top spaghetti noodles with chili and various adders like cheese and chopped onions. The flavor is also unlike anywhere else, don't know the ingredient that adds the funk.

I'm hip to hot food being the original aphrodisiac, probably why purist chili has no beans. Nothing like a misplaced fart to ruin an evening of lovemaking.

This post was modified by Earl B. Powell on 2009-11-06 16:20:52

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Poster: Mandojammer Date: Nov 6, 2009 9:15am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Wouldn't a properly placed fart also have the same result?

Maybe I don't want to know how one properly places a fart when bumping nasties.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 6, 2009 9:30am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Ha! Good one. Yeah, I had to give all this up for two years while in Maine (80s)..."Toma tilly O?" "uh...no...we don't have those...?"

Could hardly find any Mexican ingred up that way back then...

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Poster: Finster Baby Date: Nov 7, 2009 10:55am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Earl..
Interesting twist with the honey and pineapple. Will for sure try that. I love to try new things when I cook!!!

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Poster: Misty Eastwood Date: Nov 7, 2009 11:37am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

I think a nice sweet mango chutney or an exotic fruit terrine would do the trick instead of just adding the honey, plus beautifying the presentation. I would also puree the corn w/ cilantro and candied ginger to drizzle the plate.

This post was modified by deadski on 2009-11-07 19:37:18

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Poster: waynecs Date: Nov 6, 2009 1:56pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Why go to so much trouble when you can just go to Wendy's?

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 6, 2009 2:34pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Bastard! Kill him!!! I want to kill him!

{Peter Sellers movie...but, frankly Wayne, you deserve it...]

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Poster: vapors Date: Nov 6, 2009 5:17pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Thanks to all – wasn’t certain how it might go down. In my professional experience I have done much, but for many years I was a health conscious vegetarian at home and that’s how my kids were raised. I suppose my recipe is better labeled beans and rice.

Now my gumbo, that will never be vegetarian.

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Poster: Misty Eastwood Date: Nov 7, 2009 6:41am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

iko iko... now that shomo shamus has passed for another week and budget meats in hibernation try this one >

2 tablespoons oil
1/2 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup chopped green pepper
1 clove garlic, minced
8 cups (2 16-ounce cans) tomatoes, undrained
2/3 cup (6-ounce can) tomato paste
1 pound lean ground beef
1 cup cubed rattlesnake or chicken
2 tablespoons chili powder
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
2 cups water
2 cups (6 ounces) uncooked pasta (for instance, macaroni)

In 5-quart saucepan or Dutch oven, heat oil and saute onion, green pepper,
and garlic until tender but not brown. Add ground beef and rattlesnake;
brown and cook until done, about 5 minutes. Stir in spices, tomatoes, and
tomato paste. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer about 2 hours.
Before serving, add water and return chili to a boil. Stir in uncooked
pasta; continue boiling, stirring frequently, 10 to 15 minutes or until
pasta is tender.

NOTES:
Reduce the simmering time if you must, but if you don't give it at least
half an hour, your results won't be as good. The pasta added at the end
significantly reduces the spiciness of this dish; don't be timid when
adding the hot stuff. If you fancy crackers with or in your chili, you
might want to try popcorn instead. It's a delightful change of pace!



Dressing Rattlesnakes
---------------------

Take dead rattlesnake, place on cutting board and hold firmly behind the head.

Cut off head and discard.

Cut off rattles for your collection. They look good on display, made into necklaces, etc.

Strip off the skin and save. One long skin can make a good hatband (With enough skins you can make a fine pair of boots)

Make a long slice on the underside and remove all internal organs.

Cut into chunks, and refrigerate until ready to use. (Can be frozen.)

Use as directed in your favorite recipes.

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Poster: DeadRed1971 Date: Nov 8, 2009 4:58am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

I like to use the merciless peppers of Quetzalshacatenango, grown deep in the jungle primeval by the inmates of a Guatemalan insane asylum.

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Poster: rastamon Date: Nov 8, 2009 1:59pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

I'm VERY impressed with all those reciepts. Might I add one last herb? (in the last 20min of simmering)
1 gram of ground kindbud/per cupfull of chili - huh? more....or less?

mmmmmm...yummie!

This post was modified by rastamon on 2009-11-08 21:59:35

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Poster: Saint Owen Date: Nov 8, 2009 2:17pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

NO, that would spoil your appetite. You must leave room for the yage pudding.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 6, 2009 11:12am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off; GROUP HUG!

Well Dan, I hope you've checked in to see what beauty your thread has brought to the Forum this fine fall chili cooking day!

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Poster: cush212 Date: Nov 6, 2009 11:14am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off; GROUP HUG!

Making me hungry!!! Wish I had $'s for groceries...

:(

Jalapeno cornbread is alway's good too... Yes Lard would be permitted but rarely used...

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 6, 2009 11:22am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off; GROUP HUG!

Who you calling "lard butt"? Oh...Dire...well, that's okay then. He's not here today!

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Poster: cush212 Date: Nov 6, 2009 11:26am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off; GROUP HUG!


;)

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Poster: cush212 Date: Nov 6, 2009 11:40am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off; BLATANT HIGHJACK!!!

Apparently an unsucessful Hihgjack, So what else is knew...

Been awhile since I could Highjack A thread here... How's life on the northside? Doe's not include Chili recipes...

Only have 15 minutes or so though...

This post was modified by cush212 on 2009-11-06 19:32:50

This post was modified by cush212 on 2009-11-06 19:40:43

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Poster: cush212 Date: Nov 6, 2009 11:49am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off; BLATANT HIGHJACK!!!

Just fine then... I can't seem to do anything right anymore...

:(

See you all later...

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Poster: Misty Eastwood Date: Nov 6, 2009 11:59am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off; BLATANT HIGHJACK!!!

Remember GD trading cards.... King Neptune is shopping for budget chili meat in this one or is it a dire's day-off cartoon, which is quite loony knowing dire even has a job. Maybe his nite jobs are paying this weekend.

Anyhow, don't forget to rub the meat, dire.

http://www.metrosea.com/blog/please.jpg

This post was modified by deadski on 2009-11-06 19:59:22

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Poster: Edsel Date: Nov 6, 2009 6:51am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: forum chili cook-off

Brown sugar boys and girls, brown sugar. Start with a tablespoon for a half gallon +